Home > Slide Shows/Photo Galleries > Ophelia on her Own

Ophelia on her Own

Disclaimer: I do not own any of the images I have included in this presentation. Due credits are to be cited below.

Though Hamlet may well be considered as one of the Bard’s more popular plays, little is known of the tragic character of Ophelia, much is due to the fact that little is mentioned of her in the play. In this presentation however, let’s take a peek at how she has transcended centuries and media alike, through that which has made her most famous: her drowning. Enjoy! 🙂

http://prezi.com/4pjaqnsas_x7/ophelia/

Image sources

”                Getty Images – Unsupported browser detected  .” Getty Images – Unsupported browser detected . N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. <http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/3303678/Hulton-Archive&gt;.  circa 1910: Actress Gertrude Elliott in the role of Ophelia, from a theatre production of Shakespeare’s ‘Hamlet’. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

”                Ophelia Immortal (Nude) Painting at ArtistRising.com  .” Artist Rising – Original Artwork and High-Quality Art Prints by Living Artists . N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. <http://www.artistrising.com/products/57766/ophelia-immortal-nude.htm&gt;.  Eleanor HardwickOphelia is Drowned, 2008Digital printJulia DOphelia, 2008Digital printFerafestivaOphelia, 2008Digital print–Jasmine Becket-GriffithOphelia Immortal (Nude)Painting

” Google Image Result for http://www.sironasims.com/v2/wp-content/uploads/2008/08/ophelia-female-sim-2.jpg.&#8221; Google. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. <http://www.google.com.ph/imglanding?q=OPHELIA&hl=en&sa=X&rlz=1C1_____enPH406PH406&biw=1024&bih=610&tbs=isch:1&tbnid=T2rpxLNb85vnbM:&imgrefurl=http://www.sironasims.com/ophelia.html&imgurl=http://www.sironasims.com/v2/wp-content/uploads/2008/08/ophelia-fem&gt;.

“Bardfilm: November 2009.” Bardfilm. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Mar. 2011. <http://bardfilm.blogspot.com/2009_11_01_archive.html&gt;.

“Flickr: Tagged with hamlet.” Welcome to Flickr – Photo Sharing. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. <http://www.flickr.com/photos/tags/hamlet/clusters/shakespeare-ophelia-skull/&gt;.  Eleanor HardwickOphelia is Drowned, 2008Digital printJulia DOphelia, 2008Digital printFerafestivaOphelia, 2008Digital print

Henningham, John. ”  Review: The Secret Love Life of Ophelia : newsbytes.” newsbytes. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. <http://newsbytes.com.au/2010/08/review-the-secret-love-life-of-ophelia/&gt;.  circa 1910: Actress Gertrude Elliott in the role of Ophelia, from a theatre production of Shakespeare’s ‘Hamlet’. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

“Robert J. Walker – Ophelia.” Epilogue. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Mar. 2011. <www.epilogue.net/cgi/database/art/view.pl?id=89618>.

“The Trap Door Theatre Presents 12 OPHELIAS: A PLAY WITH BROKEN SONGS 9/24 2009/09/11 .” Chicago.BroadwayWorld.com – Chicago’s Premier Theater Web Resource. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. <http://chicago.broadwayworld.com/article/The_Trap_Door_Theatre_Presents_12_OPHELIAS_A_PLAY_WITH_BROKEN_SONGS_924_20090911&gt;.

“Traditional and stylish stained glass by Angie at HareMoonStainedGlass.co.uk.” Stained glass in Somerset by Angie at HareMoonStainedGlass. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. <http://www.haremoonstainedglass.co.uk/intro.htm&gt;.  circa 1910: Actress Gertrude Elliott in the role of Ophelia, from a theatre production of Shakespeare’s ‘Hamlet’. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

“Witchwood Bazaar    The Art of DAVID S. CLAYTON.: Ophelia.” Witchwood Bazaar    The Art of DAVID S. CLAYTON.. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Mar. 2011. <http://witchwoodbazaar.blogspot.com/2011/01/ophelia.html&gt;.  circa 1910: Actress Gertrude Elliott in the role of Ophelia, from a theatre production of Shakespeare’s ‘Hamlet’. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

““Ophelia” in Hackney and Lego « How to be a Retronaut.” How to be a Retronaut. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Mar. 2011. <http://www.howtobearetronaut.com/2010/07/ophelia-in-hackney-and-lego/&gt;.

Marionne Jay C. Shimada

2009 – 11860

BA English Studies: Literature

University of the Philippines Diliman

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  1. isheee
    March 17, 2011 at 2:42 pm

    I agree. Ophelia (and some of Shakespeare’s other female characters) seems to usually just belong to the background, or have this role that makes them quite, in blunt terms, useless.

    I am amazed at how Ophelia has been portrayed in so many different ways, either with her conventional appearance or probably with some slight deviation from what is to be expected. Your presentation has shown us this most effectively.

    Then again, from here we can clearly see that Shakespeare is everywhere. Even Ophelia, who I believe would not actually be at par with Juliet’s fame around the world (which I deem quite unfair), has her fair share of exposure in different modes of media. I mean, SIMS? And Lego? 🙂

    Nice work! Cheers, Ms. Shimada. 🙂

  2. March 20, 2011 at 2:13 pm

    Excellent work! The accuracy of your citations, the variety of your Ophelias, and your sheer mastery in their combination, make your presentation useful, entertaining and memorable. I never knew Ophelia could still be deconstructed in this colorful a manner considering that we already took her up in class last year. I disagree, however, in your secluding just one painting as “erotic,” because almost all of the depictions have an erotic side to them, whether obvious or intangible. Ophelia’s eyes are haunting and romantic before they become frightening and tragic. Her body comes across in these works as somewhat spoiled or sacrificed, though not ignorant of her young heroism and quiet defiance. Ophelia is the queen of Shakespeare’s tragedies. You are now, in doing justice to her death through Prezi, her modern maid. Congrats! 🙂

  3. mjcshimada
    March 20, 2011 at 4:25 pm

    Hello Ms. Lampa and Mr. Velasco 😉

    Strangely enough, yes, I do agree with you Mr. Velasco. Actually the first time I was browsing through images of Ophelia I found that one common denominator of these images were the “eroticism” and shall I say, sensuality, that the artists have depicted in their Ophelias. I guess with the photo that you had pointed out earlier, I had labeled as “erotic” probably because it was the first thing that came into my mind, as opposed to the other images, where the first thing I’d notice would be that child-like innocence and the oblivious attitude of Ophelia to her environment, sometimes even to herself (the eyes are a great mirror of expression in these depictions). Also, I find it interesting that Ophelia in her own way has come to define, or even be a symbol of the descent to insanity of the women, even in today’s modern era. And as a sidenote, one thing I found out was that every ime these artists (photographers, digital artists, painters, etc.) needed a subject for a theme like drowning and madness, Ophelia shows up with the most hits.

    P.S. And as to your second-to-the-last statement, I wholeheartedly agree with you when you said that Ophelia is the queen of Shakespeare’s tragedies. Even more so that she almost personifies that whole concept of tragedy through her persona. Thanks for viewing!

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